Next Meeting:
Tuesday, 3rd of February 7 PM (NEW TIME)
Carrow’s Restaurant 605 N. Wells Avenue (Wells and 6th), Reno, NV

February: Presidential Medals, Doug Larson

March: Comstock Mines: NV ideas in silver

April: Coins of Constantine David Elliott

The Last Meeting
Only about 25 attended the dinner! You  missed out on prime rib and a Morgan dollar in the raffle. Rusty showed us pictures of past members and current
members with hair not grey or white. I’ll get them on the website eventually. Garret Allen got his bone marrow transplant. It seems to have taken, but he’s
staying in the hospital in SF. He thanks everyone for  all the support. We begin the bimonthly BID BOARD in February! Everyone  who brings in a item
will get 3 FREE raffle tickets and we are no longer taking 10% for the club.(Donations accepted).The Truman dollar is coming out the Feb. 5, the first
quarter Feb. 24 and the Native American dollar in March. I am seeing adds for the 2015 silver eagle for $18.95, has silver fallen that low? We’re thinking
about a Reno Coin Club Aces baseball day, probably on a Sunday, we can get a block of tickets, get recognized on the big screen, and maybe give away
a half dollar baseball coin. Laurel Hoggah’s idea. Rusty and Laurel are working on starting National Coin Week in Reno at the Northwest library on
Saturday April 18th with lectures and displays. Please let us know about any ideas or things you would like to see. We will be at the museum as usual on
the 24th and 25th . All the officers and board members were re-elected by acclamation, except the treasurer who voted against himself.. Winter meeting
time 7PM, board meeting 6PM. Please come after 6:30PM if you are not attending the board
.

                               







Early Bird Prize  was 1968SW Conference medals won by not noted. (The early bird winner needs to check in with Andre)
                                                                       
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    
Raffle prizes winners were:
 
Bart Daniel: last colored $2, Civil War copper round
Clay Thomas:Morgan Dollar
Ed Cranch:mystery box 1976 S slabbed Ike& planchettes,
old & new buffalo .05, Christmas medal
Rick DeAvila: 3 au steel cents
Gil Cerruti:1971D unc.Ike, unc.NV 2004P .25
David Elliott: dinosaur copper round, mint bag
Howard Buchler: set 2013S .25, presidential $1
Mike Carolan:2014S .25 set, Redfield book,
Ron Paul book on gold, Mexico 50 peso coin
Brent Speigle: unc. 1976 .50, brass coin club medal                
 Everglades .25, 2014S set now here!
Ken Hopple: chocolate coins, copper RCC medal
Leo Rossow: Navy copper round, 10 pesos Pero coin

THANKS TO RUSTY KING WE WILL HAVE MORGAN DOLLARS IN NEXT  RAFFLE!!!

                         Auctions
                       No auctions.

                       Quarter Pot
Ron Jahn won the quarter. About $5.

I WANT TO THANK EVERYONE WHO DONATES TO THE RAFFLE!

Dues are Due, $15 January 1

Upcoming Coin Shows

January 23-25, San Jose Coin Club Coin Show, Doubletree Hotel, 2050 Gateway Place, Admit:$4, Tables: 70 Chair: Ray Johnson, 408 598-7772, www.
sanjosecoinclub.org  SanJoseCoins@aol.com

J
anuary 29-30, Long Beach Coin Show, Long Beach Convention Centre, 100 S. Pine Ave., Admit:$8, Tables: 400+ Chair: Taryn Warrecker, 805 680-0294,
www.longbeachexpo.com TWarrecker@collectors.com

February 13-14, Redwood Empire Coin Club Coin Show, E.L. Finely Hall, Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa, Admit: $2,
Tables: 60 Chair: Merle Avila, 707 824-4811

February 15, Cupertino Coin Club Coin Show, Napredak Hall, 770 Montague Expressway, San Jose, Admit:$2, Tables: 35 Chair: Bruce Braga, 408 893-1883,
BruceBraga1@aim.com

February 21-22, San Francisco Coin & Collectibles Show, S. SF Conference Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd., Admit:$5,Tables:35 Chair:Scott Griffin,415 601-8661
www.griffincoin.com scott@griffincoin.com

RCC Officers
David Elliott….......... President….......…815-8625
Rusty King..............Vice President......... 677-7057
Doug Larson............Past President..........843-0162
Gerald Breedlove........Treasurer..............425-2967
Andre Azzam ..............Secretary….........338-0707
Paul Williams…..........Director….......…720-5395
Joe Wozniak.............…Director…......…853-4223
Ken Hopple ....…..........Director..............677-1544
Shannon Holmes...........Director..............827–4359
Paul Williams…..........ANA Rep.............720-5395
David Elliott...................Editor................815-8625

datbbelliotts@prodigy.net  www.renocoinclub.org

The RCC Board meets the 1st  Tuesday of the month at Carrow’s at
6 PM (NEW TIME). Everyone is invited to attend Please come after 6:30PM if not attending
the board meeting. We're all old (mostly) and can't hear each other in a room full of people.

The Other Coin: Pompei Magnus











I recently scored the long sought portrait coin of Gnaeus Pompei Magnus (106-48 BC). He was the greatest general of late Republican Rome and the balance of
power between the
optimates (the best, the nobles) and populares (the people, the masses). His father sided with Marius the populares general even though the
family were “new men” wealthy non-Latin citizens from Picenium. Pompei fought dutifully at his father’s side, but switched to Sulla, the optimates leader upon his
father’s death, bringing not only victory to Sulla, but slaughtering the Marian opposition even after they surrendered. Refusing to disband his army, he gained a
triumph and the title Great, then went on to defeat an uprising in Spain, the pirates of the Mediterranean, Spartacus, and Mithradates VI. He made the Mediterranean
and Black Sea, Roman pond,  setting up client kings in Armenia, Jerusalem, Egypt, Cilicia, and a dozen more (I have collected coins from each of his client kings-
Tarkondimotos of Cilicia and Juba I of Mauretania below).  












Senatorial politics that brought down the Roman Republic are eerily much like our own. The wealthy establishment (wealthy from insider government
favors) divided between the populares that offered more and more welfare to the urban populace of Rome finally bankrupting the government and the
optimates that financed their own armies and campaigns from inherited or self-made riches, bankrupting the government with military adventures to
enhance their wealth and power. Both sought a military dictatorship with themselves as emperor for life. (Even the enemies of Rome came from the same
part of the world-N. Africa, Middle East, Asia Minor, although neither Arabs nor Muslims.)
One of Pompei’s junior officers and eventual allies was Julius Caesar, who married Pompei’s daughter. Just as Pompei had married Sulla’s daughter in an
alliance that fell apart into civil war, so Julius Caesar fought a civil war against Pompei. Defeated, Pompei fled to Ptolemy XIII, the teenage brother/
husband of Cleopatra VII, whom he was battling. Siding with the recent victor, Ptolemy had Pompei executed under a flag of friendship and his head sent
to Julius Caesar, who was so enraged that he sided with Cleopatra in the war against her brother. (Handel wrote an opera)














Ptolemy XIII left no portrait coin; put Ptolemy I on his silver coins. The bronze and silver coins are dated and we know when he was sole ruler in Cyprus. The
above Cyprus coin is dated to his rule with Zeus Ammon on the obverse, 2 eagles, Isis headdress on reverse)
Pompei followed Roman law and did not put his portrait on any coin he produced. His sons continued the fight against Julius Caesar and then Octavian and minted
several coins with his portrait in Sicily and could chose no better reverse than the Catanaean (from Catana, Sicily) brothers carrying their parents on their
shoulders, saving them from an eruption of Mount Aetna. They were the supreme example of filial piety.

      Numismatically yours, David Elliott

Numismatic Potpourri
    The cool US Marshall coins are being offered 1-29 and will be about $5 cheaper the first 30 days of sales. The silver dollar proof will be $46.95, unc. $43.94
and clad half proof $14.95 and unc. $13.95. Gold price for $5 not set yet. They will be available at the upcoming Long Beach show first.























Winston Churchill 20 pound silver coin is selling for face value and will sell out quickly. They can be bought at www.royalmint.com There will also be the
circulating 5 pound coin to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death.














Bernard von NotHaus of Liberty Dollar fame had his verdict of 15 years of prison, $250,000, and confiscation of all his gold and silver bullion worth about $7
million reduced to 3 years probation. The US intended to make an example of the ‘domestic terrorist’ (statement by the FBI).The 70-year-old von NotHaus wanted
to make a philosophical point with his Liberty Dollar in support of hard silver and gold currency. However, after the judge determined he was not a terrorist, he
stressed that the private currency was strictly illegal. Von NotHaus was now sentenced to six months of home detention, to run concurrently with three years of
probation.
Evidently the government was scared of a few million dollars of real money. Whatever happened to all the communist East German currency, you
ask?
2014 was the last year to turn it earn for euros and the largely aluminum coins were melted down for car parts. The notes were stacked in an old mine where
they will quickly rot. Wouldn’t have happened to silver and gold.
The time capsule in Massachusetts was in coin news, but none of the museum announcements
of contents included the exact nature of the coins found along with the newspapers and silver commemorative plaque by Paul Revere. In 1795, then-Massachusetts
Gov. Samuel Adams, famed patriot Paul Revere and Col. William Scollay buried a time capsule under the Massachusetts State House cornerstone in Boston. It was
opened in 1855 during renovations, and two sets of 1855 coins half penny to dollar were placed in the time capsule along with several 1855 newspapers. Of the
dozen earlier coins only the 1652 pine shilling coin and George Washington medal are detailed, although mention of a half-cent, one-cent, half-dime, 10-cent and 25-
cent coins probably refer to US currency and many copper coins to various state or unofficial coinage.. Hopefully, someone from Coin World will go look before it
is all reburied.
Two US coins topped $2 million at the FUN Show in Florida. They were led by a 1793 Chain Cent, graded MS66 brown by PCGS with a CAC
sticker. In its first public auction appear-ance since 1980, the Chain  cent "drew gasps and applause" when it realized $2.35 million. Nearly as spectacular was the
sale of a
1907 $20 Ultra High Relief $20 gold dollar, graded PR68 by PCGS. This rarity was offered















Canada begins a 5 year commemoration of WWI with coins of leave taking. The 2014 offerings:

























The US Mint set out high resolution images and dates for the
2015 Presidential dollars: Feb 5 Truman, April Eisenhower, June Kennedy, August Johnson.















The limited (20,000)
Roosevelt set is still available with 4 stamps, proof dollar and dime and a silver and bronze medal for $57.95



























Frank Kovacs assembled a set of
Shekels of Tyre,  Judas’ 30 pieces of silver, 38 consecutively dated coins covering the lifetime of Jesus. Expected to sell for
$150,000 as one of the dated coins is unique. The Jews at the time of Jesus were not allowed by the Romans to mint silver or gold coins, so temple taxes were
accepted in the silver coins of Tyre with head of Melqart, a Heracles figure, and eagle on reverse.
















The Collectible Coin Protection Act H.R.2754 was signed into law by President Obama on Friday, Dec. 19. It adds further protections against counterfeiters and
includes sellers and distributers as well as manufactures under its purview. Copies must be distinctly and permanently marked as such.
I assume China will ignore
this too
. Speaking of counterfeits, Hollywood recently got in trouble for too accurate prop money. In the early days of film making, producers still used real
money. It wasn’t until the 1960s that a company solely dedicated to manufacturing prop money came into being, and its products steadily increased in quality.
While producing an action film in 2000, hundreds of thousands of banknotes were meant to be flying through the air, some of them in close-up. Perfect phonies
were needed and soon there was a visit from the Secret Service. Curious onlookers and bystanders had grabbed some of the banknotes after the crew had finished
shooting the scene in Las Vegas and tried to get rid of them in surrounding shops. The film company was in danger of being charged with the production and
circulation of counterfeit money. It didn’t help that the prop notes differed from real  banknotes in 28 details, including the phonies read “In Dog We Trust” instead
of “In God We Trust.” That explanation wasn’t good enough for the Secret Service. The authorities demanded that the company cease the production of prop
money on the grounds that banknotes could still enter circulation without being recognized as phonies.“If it’s green and it says ‘20’ on it, somebody will take it.”
J
osh Auten would really, really like some of our 2004 club medals in any metal and is willing to offer a “premium.” Contact: 970 980-4341or
pokerauten@gmail.com
Fred Holabird reminds everyone that the club’s large library is housed by
him at 3555 Airway Drive #308 (around back as Holabird Americana).
Call 852-8822
SF set of all five 2013, 2014 quarters in case $4
National Park Quarters  PDS .50        
Presidential, Native American 2013  D P $1.25
Heads of Ptolemy XIII and Cleopatra VII
gold, silver, clad designs of US Marshall coins.