Next Meeting:
Tuesday, 22nd of January (4th Tuesdays)                               
Denny’s,205 Nugget Ave.(at East McCarran), Sparks

December 25.
No meeting, no museum

January 22 Dinner, Elections, & The Carson Mint by Ken Hopple

January 25 NDinner, Elections, & The Carson Min

The Last Meeting
23 members got to see some local ore samples Rusty brought in from an old gold mine. Everyone else was watching the world series.  THE BEAUTIFUL
NEW CLUB MEDAL IS HERE! Buy 10, great Christmas present. Thanks to Jerry and Sam Dibitonto for helping out. All the old medals were sold to
large crowd at the museum on 9-27. The museum coin press was making battle born/state capitol medals for Nevada Day and has 6 designs in stock now:
pony express, Virginia Truckee railroad, CC Mint, state seal, and John Fremont. Ordered last 2018 .25. Should get here in time for me to make up some
S .25 sets for 2018. Two islands and 3 birds, a nice set and stocking stuffer. Bring up to 5 coins for the bid board now. We  have board meetings before
the meeting and ask for quiet so we can conduct business. Contact me: 815-8625 datbbelliotts@prodigy.net if any problems or ideas

Early Bird Prize: 2016S .25 set won by Joe Wozniak.                                     
               
Raffle prizes winners were:

Bart Daniel: mystery box RCC silver club medal, 1995  proof set,
2001 mint set, mint bag
Cohn: Barber .25
Laurel Hogan: 1944 Merc .10, LV bingo chip
Thomas Charleton: type set capitol holder, 1978 mint set
Rick De Avila: Indian head .01, chocolate coins, 2x2
Bill Nailer: book on Georgia mint, chocolate coins
Milton Angel: set NA $1
Joe Wozniak: 2016S .25 set, storage boxes
Dave Loder: 1995 .01 roll, bag of NV tokens
Phil Shallit: buffalo .05
Jerry Breedlove: 2x2 coin holders
Ken Hopple: 1g silver bar
Leo Rossow: coin albums
David Elliott: coin wallets

Auctions

1898 O $1 donated by David Elliott won by Rick De Avila for $36.

Quarter Pot

Robert Rodriguez won the quarter pot, but no .25 put in.                  

I WANT TO THANK EVERYONE WHO DONATES TO THE RAFFLE!

Upcoming Coin Shows

November 16-18 Las Vegas Numismatic Society Coin Show, Palace Station Hotel, 2411 W.Sahara Ave., Admit:?, Tables:?, CK Shows 888 330-5188
info@ckshows.com www.ckshows.com

November 30-Dec 1
San Francisco International Coin Show, Holiday Inn golden Gateway, 1500 Van Ness Ave., Admit:$8, Tables:?, Scott Griffin 415 601-
8661 scott@griffin.com  www.griffincoin.com


RCC Officers

David Elliott….......... President…........…815-8625
Rusty King..............Vice President......... 677-7057
Doug Larson............Past President..........843-0162
Gerald Breedlove........Treasurer..............425-2967
Andre Azzam ..............Secretary….........338-0707
Laurel Hoggan…..........Librarian..........…223-5096
Joe Wozniak.............…Director….......…853-4223
Ken Hopple ....…..........Director..............677-1544
Shannon Holmes...........Director..............827–4359
Paul Williams…..........ANA Rep..............720-5395
David Elliott...................Editor................815-8625

datbbelliotts@prodigy.net  www.renocoinclub.org

Not the Other Coin: New Reno coin club Medal

Our new medal celebrates the 50th anniversary of Eva Adams Director of the US Mint 1961-1969 and the moon landing 1969 with an engine developed
and tested in Palomino Valley, NV. Eva Adams was a member of the Reno Coin Club until her death in 1991. She gave autographed dollars bills to the
young members of the club. She was born in Wonder, Nevada on September 10, 1908. Her father worked for mining magnate George Wingfield, and set
up hotels, bars,  and commissaries in Wingfield's mining camps. The family had to move from camp to camp for  years before Adams' mother insisted
the family settle down in Reno. Eva Adams graduated from Reno High School at age 14. She then attended the University of Nevada, Reno. After college,
Adams moved to Las Vegas to become a teacher at Las Vegas High School. She went back east to earn an MA in English and a law degree. She returned
to Nevada in 1940 to briefly join the English department of UNR. Shortly thereafter, Senator Pat McCarran invited her to move to Washington to become
his administrative assistant. She worked for Senator McCarran until his death in 1954, Senator Ernest S. Brown, and then Senator Alan Bible. In 1961,
President of the United States John F. Kennedy named Adams Director of the US Mint, and Adams subsequently held that office from October 1961 until
August 1969. The end of silver coinage caused a coin shortage as people hoarded silver coins. She requested the coin press at the Nevada State Museum
be sent to Denver to help make coins. The coin press then had a history of minting coins for Carson City, San Francisco, and Denver. We are proud to
have her on our new medal. The Reno arch is to the right.
We are also celebrating the landing on the moon in 1969 and Nevada’s involvement. From 1962 to 1970, Rocketdyne operated a vast facility on nearly
200 square miles of land mostly east of Pyramid Highway between Sparks and Pyramid Lake. Hidden from public view and under tight security,
engineers erected massive apparatus to test engines and thrusters that would be used on Gemini and Apollo spacecraft, the lunar module and the space
shuttle. The rocket that lifted Buzz Aldrin from the moon came from the testing facility at Palomino Valley. The reverse is based on the Eagle has
landed design found on the Susan B. Anthony and Eisenhower dollar with the dates of the moon landing above. Medals will sell for $65 for silver, $15 for
brass and copper.

Numismatically yours, David Elliott

Numismatic Potpourri

Well, I was right about the design for the moon coin out in January. No pricing yet. There will be a $5 gold coin, a standard size $1 silver coin, a half
dollar clad coin, and a five ounce $1 silver proof coin. In a manufacturing first for the Mint, the five ounce silver proof coin will be curved, as will the
other coins in the program with a concave footprint and convex helmet Nearly 1,000 certified items from the collection of astronaut Neil Armstrong  
were sold by Heritage Auctions. Armstrong carried this Apollo 11 Gilt Fliteline Medal on the Apollo 11 lunar module. It realized $275,000. Favored design
for 2019 Native American dollar has feathers and a planets with a lot of cool designs with spaceship rejected. Does not appear to be a final decision yet.
Evidently someone told the mint there are 500 tribes, and they have let bureaucrats at National Museum of the American Indian in DC and NY come up
with themes celebrating government except for Eastman :2020 Anti-discrimination Act of 1945, 2021 American Indians in the U.S. military service, 2022
Ely Samuel Parker, 2023 Charles Alexander Eastman. 2024 The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924. Hope there will be some nice designs anyway.


























The  Robert Rodriguez is torturing his 1792 disme in the cyclotron in Chicago. He has some new treasures; in particular a pattern 1792 George
Washington half dollar. Peter Getz struck these trial pieces in 1792 in silver and copper presumably in hopes of getting a job or contract from the US
mint. Nice portrait of George Washington, who did not want to be king or have his portrait on US coins. Just 22 examples of all variants of the silver
coins. The US Mint will be selling currency
for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, starting now on their website. The US Mint also has their presidential coins on silver eagle planchettes for sale
for $40 or $45 with an official engraving from BEP. Terrelle Robert Talbot requested various bank tellers exchange rolled $2 coins for banknotes. The
rolls of coins looked authentic with a real toonie on either end, but unbeknownst to the tellers, all the other “coins” inside the roll were actually metal
washers. 17 banks in British Columbia were defrauded of more than $30,000. They decided on 2020 Coast Guard design on 2.5 ounce silver coins and
almost have the design for Air Force. The jets will be on the obverse with memorial and honor guard or eagle on the reverse. All the services will get
medals.















The rarest and most famous of all U.S. currency notes, the legendary 1890 $1,000 Treasury Note, known as the "Grand Watermelon note," due to the
design of the large zeroes on the reversed side of the bill, resembling watermelons, became the single most valuable piece of currency when it sold for
$3,290,000. The portrait of General George Meade on the $1000 Note was engraved by renowned artist and line engraver Charles Burt





























The US Mint at their annual meeting said a great many programs will be directed at children and youth next year, will be more active in legislation
concerning coinage and plans to have joint products with the Canadian, British, and Australian mints. Most intriguing of all they said they will be
introducing error coins into circulating coinage for people to find. The new polymer notes in Britain, Canada, New Zealand and elsewhere have a bit of
tallow in them complain vegans. The American Numismatic Society (ANS) this week mounted an exhibit in the ANS foyer, displaying select examples
from the recently acquired Medallic Arts Company (MACO) archives. In 2018, the ANS acquired the archives of MACO, a collection of more than 50,000
items of historic and numismatic significance. MACO was founded in New York City around 1909 as a private mint producing medals and galvanos by
some of the most prominent American sculptors of the twentieth century. The ANS acquired the archives as part of the bankruptcy proceedings of the
Northwest Territorial Mint in a bid to preserve the heritage of the important mint and make available its archives for future study and research. British
Library put on display a rare coin of King Offa of Mercia, who reigned between 757AD to 796AD. He minted hundreds of gold dinars featuring his name
and the Islamic declaration of faith. The Christian ruler sought to trade with Europe and the Mediterranean including the then Muslim-controlled Spain,
which explains the coinage. Proof Platinum Eagles in years 2021 to 2025 will depict obverse designs emblematic of the five freedoms enumerated in the
First Amendment to the United States Constitution: the freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to peaceably assemble,
and freedom to petition the government for a redress of grievances.














A $2 circulation coin marking the 100th anniversary of the First World War Armistice by the Royal Canadian Mint. Recalling the signing of the historic
peace treaty that officially ended the Great War on Nov. 11, 1918. A total of three million coins, including two million selectively colored and one million
unpainted, will be issued nationwide. On January 1st, 2015, Lithuania officially changed their national currency to the euro, joining many other
European nations in using the widely accepted monetary system. So, to celebrate, they broke a world record with a pyramid made out of their disused
coins, over a million one-cent pieces . The project was the brainchild of two Lithuanian physics students, Vytautas Jakštass and Domas Jokubauskis, who
wanted to create a fitting memorial to the currency they grew up with. Proof Platinum Eagles in years 2021 to 2025 will depict obverse designs
emblematic of the five freedoms enumerated in the First Amendment to the United States Constitution: the freedom of religion, freedom of speech,
freedom of the press, freedom to peaceably assemble, and freedom to petition the government for a redress of grievances. Cool Deep Space 9 coin from
Canada, about 31g, about $115. It’s the 25th anniversary of DS9 this year.
















In 1905 the International Workers of the World (IWW or Wobblies) was created. In 1906 Goldfield had suddenly emerged as the biggest, most
important, richest mining area in the United States. It would make a great place for the IWW to flex its muscles. In December 1906 and January 1907
they orchestrated small strikes for higher wages and it looked like the union would win this victory. But at the same time George Wingfield was gaining
strength among the mine owners. He has become the most important owner, powerful and was unscrupulous. He convinced Governor Sparks to get
Teddy Roosevelt to call in Federal Troops. He manipulated a jury into finding the strike leaders guilty of various crimes. The strike utterly failed.
April2011-1st Spouses in
BronzeAncient Coins in US
History,In God We Trust
March2011-RCC Goes Digital
2010 Reno
Cartwheels
Feb2011- Cupid & Psyche
Jan2011-2 Roman Quinarii
Back Issues
May 2011: Copper Bullion?
June2011-Notgeld
July2011-Coins of Cyprus
August 2011-Coins of
Alexander the Great
Sept2011-Late Roman Bronzes
Oct2011-US Park Quarters
Nov2011-Arabic,Ottoman Coins
Dec2011:Snakes & Ancient Coins
Jan2012-Al Shay In memoriam
Feb2012-Republican Coins
March2012-Olympic coins
April2012-Tour of Medallic Arts
May 2012 ANA 2012:
Cowries to
Credit Card,
from Bullion to Fiat Money
June2012-WWII coins
July2012-CarsonCoinPress
Aug2012-CanadianCoins
Sept2012-California Gold
Oct2012-US Mint medals
Nov2012-US Inaugural Medals
Dec2012-Electrum Coins
Jan2013-Counterfeit Gold
Feb2013-Silk Road Coins
March2013-Great Patriotic
of Wars Russia in Coins
April2013-NCW2013buffalos
May2013-Elymais Coins
June2013-Philoktetes
July2013-Origin of Dollar
Aug2013 Constantine
Adventus Aug
Sept2013-NV & CO Coin Trip
Oct2013-Cleopatra coins
Nov2013-Monstrous coins
Fred Holabird reminds everyone that the club’s large library is housed by him at
3555 Airway Drive #308 (around back as Holabird Americana). Call 851-1859
Dec2013-Crusader coins
Jan 2014-Euros
Feb2014-Lincoln Penny
March2014-Leto coin
April2014-So-called Dollars
SF set of all five 2013-2017S quarters in case $5
National Park Quarters  PDS .50        
Presidential, Native American  D P $1.25
May 2014-Kennedy Halves
June 2014-WWII Coins
July2014-Ancient Cast coinage
Aug2014-E. European coins
Sept2014-Roman enemies coins
Oct 2014-Old Coin Press#1
Nov2014-LaVere Redfield
Dec2014-Vietnamese Coins
Jan2015:The Four Wisemen
Feb 2015 Pompei Magnus
March2015 Richard II
& English coins
April2015-Reagan Dollar
205 Nugget Ave. Sparks, NV
by Holiday Inn, across Hwy 80 from
Western Village
May2015-Shapur I & Sparadokos
June2015-CCAC
July2015-Roman Coins in India
Aug 2015-Persis,Elymais,Parthia
Sept2015-US 20 cent
Oct2015-German Coins
Nov2015-HolyRomanEmperors
Dec2015-3 Wiseman
Jan2016-N.Black Sea coins
Feb2016-Rape of Persephone
March2016-Coins at NY museums
April2016-Liberty on coins
May2016-Cyprus Coins
June 2016-Olympia bronze
July 2016-Medals
August2016-Anaheim World
Fairof Money review
Sept2016-Treasures found
at World Fair of Money
Oct2016-Presidential dollars
Nov2016-Barter to Coins
Jan2017-So-Called dollars
Dec2016-Egyptian temple
& Scipio Africanus
Feb2017-Russian coins1
March2017-Russian coins2
April2017-Augustus,Son of god
May2017-Pyrrhus Coins
July2017-Ancient Jewish Coins
Augt2017-Portuguese Colonies
Sept 2017-Coins on the Web
Oct2017-Unity coins
Nov2017-Papal Coins
Dec2017-2018 coins
https://renocoinclub.libib.com
Jan2018-Georgia coins
Feb2018-Armenia coins
2018 S .25 sets, Jim Thorpe $1, and Rhode Island .25 here
March2018-Paper Money
April2018-Morgan1884O VAMs
May2018-Trebizond coins
July2018-tax tokens
June2018-3 Romes
July2018-tax tokens
AugSept2018-AncientCounterfeits
Dues are Due,
$20 January 1
VOLUNTEER NEEDED!!!
Trish will be off to help nurse a
cancer patient. Please
consider helping David the last
Friday of the month at the
State Museum in Carson City.
January to April. Free ride and
dinner. Call 815-8625
Dues are
Due, $20
January 1
VOLUNTEER NEEDED!!!
Trish will be off to help nurse a
cancer patient. Please
consider helping David the last
Friday of the month at the
State Museum in Carson City.
January to April. Free ride and
dinner. Call 815-8625
Dues are
Due, $20
January 1
Oct2018-Italian Museums
Next Meeting:
Tuesday, 22nd of January (4th Tuesdays)                               
Denny’s,205 Nugget Ave.(at East McCarran), Sparks

January 22
Dinner, Elections, & The Carson Mint by Ken Hopple

January 25 New Coins at the Museum

February 22 No Museum (at Comic Con)

February 26
Something Presidential Doug Larson

March 26
Ukraine & Crimea Coins David Elliott

March 29
New Coins at the Museum

April 26-27 National Coin Week at the Museum

THE BEAUTIFUL NEW CLUB MEDAL IS HERE! Lowell, MA first 2019 .25 out Feb. 4 . The redesigned Native American dollar with woman rocket engineer
and space walker is out Feb. 13
much better than feathers and planets that would look like beads. No word on pricing of moon landing medal out January 24th,
9AM
, but it is a likely sell out in spite of one per family limit. Contact me: 815-8625 datbbelliotts@prodigy.net if any problems or ideas
































Reno Coin Club Blow Out Auction
With the new dollar program starting and the final National Parks quarter slated for early 2021 it is time to thin out the presidential dollars and National Park
quarters
. In particular we have all five unopened bags in boxes of 2015 and 2016 S quarters that cost $35 each without postage. We have unopened rolls of
presidential dollars: Herbert Hoover D and P, Lyndon Johnson P, Taft P, Andrew Johnson?, Franklin Pierce D, Kennedy P, Reagan P
and a roll of Puerto
Rico territorial quarters. We paid $30 each presidential roll. Also lots of individual quarters and dollars and a 12 dollar Monroe in plastic case. If we give them back to
the bank we lose .18 on dollar and .09 on a quarter, so want you to have first chance and hope to auction or sell them for more than face. I will be keeping
presidential dollars for another year or two then let them all go and the quarters through 2022 when the famous woman series begins.
Please consider buying a set
of 39 presidents (our cost $46, yours for $50)
or 45 P or D quarters (our cost $15.30, yours for $20). I have all the S quarters expect for two of 2012. These
make great presents for kids and grandkids.

Upcoming Coin Shows

January 31-Feb 1-2 Long Beach Show, Long Beach Convention Center, 100 S. Pine Ave., Admit:$10, Tables: huge, Taryn Warrecker 805 680-0294
TWarrecker@collecters.com  www.longbeachexpo.com

February 9-10 San Francisco Area Coins,Stamps & Collectibles Show,South SF Conference Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd. Admit:$4, Tables:35, Scott Griffin 415
601-8661 scott@griffincoin.com www.griffincoin.com

February 15-16 Redwood Empire Coin Club Show, Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial, 1351 Maple Ave. Admit:$2, Tables: 60, Merle Avila 707 585-3771
707 824-4811 evenings

February 17 Cupertino Coin Club Show, Saint Joseph of Cupertino Parish gym, 10110 N. De Anza Blvd. Admit:$2, Tables: 45, Bruce Braga 408 839-1883
BruceBraga1@aim.com


RCC Officers

David Elliott….......... President…........…815-8625
Rusty King..............Vice President......... 677-7057
Doug Larson............Past President..........843-0162
Gerald Breedlove........Treasurer..............425-2967
Andre Azzam ..............Secretary….........338-0707
Laurel Hoggan…..........Librarian..........…223-5096
Joe Wozniak.............…Director….......…853-4223
Ken Hopple ....…..........Director..............677-1544
Shannon Holmes...........Director..............827–4359
Paul Williams…..........ANA Rep..............720-5395
David Elliott...................Editor................815-8625

datbbelliotts@prodigy.net  www.renocoinclub.org


The Other Coin: Ukraine and the Crimea Coins, Part 2: The Reemergence

So complete was the devastation of the Ukraine and Kiev that the land became a no man’s land between the Mongol Empire and the kingdoms of Poland and
Lithuania, which battled the Golden Horde. At the very end of the 14th century Lithuania minted coins in Kiev with a crude chapel, cross, spear and a plea to the
Mother of God for help in Russian.









The Golden Horde and Horde and the Crimea Khans minted coins in the Crimea complete with tamgha or sigil (“M”a trident), name, titles, date and mint in Arabic.
The Ukraine became a borderland among the Crimean Tartars, the Ottoman Empire, Poland, Lithuania, and Russia inhabited by bands of roving Cossacks. Attempts at
Cossack independence or state formation was prevented by the contending empires, and the Russian Empire gradually assumed control of the Ukraine, the original
homeland of the Rus or Russia. In the 1700's Russia conquered Poland, Lithuania, and forced the Ottoman Empire to retreat. By the end of the 18th century the
remnants of the Golden Horde in the Crimea was also subdued and both the Crimea and the Ukraine became part of the Russian Empire.
The defeat of Russia In WWI caused the Ukraine to be ceded briefly to Germany (occupation note top left) and the subsequent Russian Civil War 1917-1921 allowed
the Ukraine a brief independence and a production of a variety of Russian Civil War notes. Since Kiev and the Ukraine were the homeland of Russian language




































and culture and differ about as much as British English and culture and American English and culture; or not at all to outsiders and a lot to insiders. What divided
Russia and the Ukraine was not language and culture, but Stalin. The Ukraine as the granary of Russia like our mid-West bore the brunt of collectivization with some
20 million deaths by government sponsored famine and government executions in the 1920s and 1930s, continuing through 1962. Similarly, the Crimean Tartars
found themselves transported to Siberia before and during WWII, unable to return until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Hatred of Stalin caused resentment
of all things Russian in both countries. It is thought that Khruschev gave the Crimea to the Ukraine in 1954 as amends Stalin’s slaughter and his own direction of
troops against the Ukrainians in the Russian Civil War, but Khrushchev also waned to increase the number of Greater Russian inhabitants in the Ukraine. Whether as
gesture of goodwill or further Russification, the Ukrainians and Crimean Tartars were not impressed and happily broke away at the collapse of the Soviet Union in
1991. Ukraine became independent and the Tartars returned home and tried to set up an independence movement. Modern Ukrainian coinage focuses on all things
Ukrainian, rich in history and monuments. So below I Vladimir’s (spelled and pronounced Volodymyr) trident between two angels and a reverse celebrating Rus (Pyc
in Russian) becoming Christian in 988 AD, spelled with the pre-Soviet i at then end. Similarly, Vladimir's trident has Ukraine with the pre-Soviet i (they abolised the
bourgeoisie letter i along with some others) and the reverse spells Russian kopeek (kopeck) kopiyok with the i and added y being a diminutive of kopok.

















The Crimea has just produced a few fantasy coins, but there are more Ukrainians and even more Russians living in the Crimea than Crimean Tartars. The dissident
coinage is all in Russian and celebrates the ancient Scythian heritage more than the Golden Horde heritage.
















Russia, of course, has a number of coins and banknotes celebrating the Crimea’s “liberation” in 2014 and in WWII featuring WWII monuments in the Crimea. There
are also fantasy coins of the future liberation of the Donbass coal mining region of the Ukraine with its Russian majority population in the Eastern Ukraine.



















































The Ukraine and the Crimea, like horribly abused spouses left when they had a chance and have no desire to return. Nevertheless, the Crimea is at best a stepchild to
the Ukraine and not a son or daughter.

Numismatically yours, David Elliott

Numismatic Potpourri

As we await the prices for the moon landing medal, the theme for National Coin Week, April 21-27 is “Discover the Past, Envision the Future” to celebrate
Apollo XI and the new American Innovator series
. There will be a lot of emphasis on the moon landing, so are medal should sell will and if someone has Susan B.
and Eisenhower dollars with the eagle has landed motif they would like to sell me for $1.10 or consign me to sell for $1.25 for National Coin Week. Let me know.

















Came across a cool bit of history.
Calvin Coolidge and Hugo Eckener bronze medal issued 1924, commemorating the flight of the blimp USS Los Angeles to
Lakehurst, NJ. Eckener and Coolidge face one another with winged figure of Peace between. On reverse is a zeppelin flying over the Atlantic Ocean with Statue of
Liberty and steam ship. After the death of the Graf von Zeppelin in 1917, Dr. Hugo Eckener became the head of the company Luftschiffbau Zeppelin and oversaw
post-war production. Built as a part of the German reparations for their participation in WWI, the USS Los Angeles, was completed in August 1924 and flown to the
United States. Eckener, along with his crew, was received by President Calvin Coolidge at the White House.
500 euro note is being phased out to battle criminal
money laundering
. 17 of the 19 European nations have stopped making the note with Austria and Germany to follow in April. The Swiss 1000 franc note will
become the new criminal favorite now.
The Innovator dollar is the top seller at the US mint. Canada has a nice 75th anniversary coin for D-Day, but the
Perth Mint has a Barbie coin, Star Trek Discovery coin, an opal pig and a Bugs and Lola coins.















































A hoard of 60 gold coins from the mid-1600s was found in a pasture in the Czech Republic. Coins from Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, and Turkey worth over
a million dollars were likely buried as Swedish Army advanced into Czechoslovakia during the Thirty Years War. On December 28th to celebrate the 150th
anniversary of
the coin press a new medal featuring the mint founder Abraham Curry was made. During World War II, 425,000 Germany, Italian, and even
some Japanese prisoners of war were held at 700 POW camps in 46 US states. A new book,
The Complete Book of World War II USA POW & Internment
Camp Chits. Prisoner of War Money in the United States
, by Dave Frank & David E. Seelye, is a comprehensive look at  the money or "chits" that the POWs
used for discretionary expenses in their camps, such as for cigarettes, candy, paper and postage, 3.2% beer, or other items. Why did prisoners of war have or even
need money? Enlisted POWs, the book explains, were allowed to work on non-military tasks such as farming, construction, and manufacturing. For this, they were
paid on a scale based on the US equivalent of their military rank. $40 in print or $20 as an e-book.
NGC is now certifying coin dies and US Mint coin production
continues at a billion dollars a month
. Based on responses to a year-end Professional Numismatist Guild (PNG) questionnaire, the aggregate prices realized for all
US coins sold at major public auctions in 2018 totaled more than $345 million, compared to $316 million in 2017.
The PNG estimates the overall US rare coin
market in 2018 was over $4 billion
not including sales by the United States Mint or bullion coins, such as gold and silver American Eagles.
Hippies get a
Summer of Love coin from Palau a year late (natch) in gold and silver. The revere has Neptune with a chest of gold and a mermaid, canoe above and
motto “at the end of the rainbow.” Can’t get more hippie than that.
Dues are Due,
$20 January 1
SF set of all five 2013-2018S quarters in case $5
National Park Quarters  PDS .50        
Presidential, Innovators,Native American  D P $1.25
Club medal silver $65, copper or brass $15
2018 S .25 sets and
American Innovators
$1 here.
Please
order medals
: $5
postage 1 medal, $12
for multiple medals;
David Elliott
2845 Edgewood Drive
Reno, NV 89503
205 Nugget Ave. Sparks, NV
by Holiday Inn, across Hwy 80 from
Western Village
Dues are
Due, $20
January 1
https://renocoinclub.libib.com
Fred Holabird reminds everyone that the club’s large library is housed by
him at 3555 Airway Drive #308 (around back as Holabird Americana).
Call 851-1859
Nov2018-RCCmedal2019
BOO
Yah
Dec2018-Ukraine & Crimea pt.1