Reno Cartwheel
March 2012

Next Meeting:

Tuesday, 6th of March 7:30 PM
Carrow’s Restaurant
605 N. Wells Avenue (Wells and 6th), Reno, NV  

March   SS Central America Inventory
Fred Holabird will tell us the true inventory of the shipwreck. Just released.

April Eva Adams at the Reno Coin Club
Presentation of Eva Adams, director of the Mint, 1966-1969, address to the Reno Coin Club.

April National Coin Week 15-21
We will be doing our Dollar Exchange at the Nevada State Museum Fri and Sat 20-21.

May ANA’s “Change in Money: Cowries to Credit Cards.” We will present ANA’s National Coin Week program.

At The Last Meeting
26 members were in attendance for Roger Vugteveen of Medallic Arts presentation of the “Medal Maker.” He donated a
copy of the DVD to the club and agreed to set up tours of the facility in Dayton, which the first two on February 28th
and March 14. Groups of no more than 10, usually on a weekday afternoon. Let someone on the board know if you are
interested in a future tour. Several people brought interesting medals. It is also noticed that our club’s 30th anniversary in
2014 will coincide with Nevada 150th anniversary. Start thing designs for medals for that. I will be bringing to Puerto
Rico and Oklahoma National Park quarters at the next meeting. No new dollars have been issued.
We just about have the IRS thing sorted out. We had to amend and resubmit our Articles of Incorporation, so let me
know if you would like a copy of the updated articles.
There is a lot of interest in having the June meeting as a pot luck or pizza meeting at someone’s house or park. Any
suggestions or volunteers would be welcome. June is usually also My Favorite coin meeting and could be held earlier,
say 6PM in case we finally get a winter.











Early Bird Prize was 1883 V nickel won by Shannon Holmes

Raffle prizes winners were:
Ken Hopple: 1972 proof set, 1983 proof set
David Elliott: mystery box , Ike dollar key chain, DVD on FG Hoard, Krause 19th C.
Bart Daniels: Liberty medal, Andrew Johnson dollars, 2 Lincoln dollars, WWII coins, Double Eagle book
Shannon Holmes: 1948 dime, Jefferson nickel albums
Jack Gruhler: 1904 V nickel, 1988 penny, World paper money book, Washington Quarter albums
Steve Podhurst: Ferdinand and Isabella copy
Auctions
An AU 1953 Franklin half donated by Rusty King was won for $20 by Paul Williams
Quarter Pot
Doug Larson won the quarter pot, not present.

I WANT TO THANK EVERYONE WHO DONATES TO THE RAFFLE!







Fred Holabird wanted to remind everyone that the club’s large library is house by him at 3555 Airway Drive #308
(around back as Holabird Americana). Call ahead 852-8822.

Upcoming Coin Shows

March 11 Livermore Valley Coin Club
Elks Lodge, 940 Larkspur Bourse Chair: Steve Kramer, 925-422-3794

March 31-April 1 2012 Westerns Token Jamboree
Red Lion Inn, 1401 Arden Way, Sacramento Bourse Chair: Michael Werner, 415-928-3794

May 6 Vallejo Numismatic Society Show
Veteran’s Memorial Building, 420 Admiral Callaghan Lane Bourse Chair: Harry Davis, 707-642-0216

May 19-20 Carson City Downtown Coin Club Annual Coin Show
10-5 Sat, 10-4 Sun, Carson City Nugget, 507 N. Carson, Admission $2.  Bourse Chair: Dan Wilson, 775-883-4653,
downtown coin@gmail.com


RCC Officers
David Elliott….......... President….......…815-8625
Doug Larson..........Past President..........843-0162
Rusty King..............Vice President........ 673-6745
Gerald Breedlove........Treasurer..............425-2967
Andre Azzam ..............Secretary….........338-0707
Dan Waterman…..........Director….......…747-4380
Ed Waselewski.........…Director…......….354-0287
Ken Hopple ....…..........Director..............677-1544
Bob Wagner..................Director..............3781022
Paul Williams…..........ANA Rep...............720-5395
David Elliott...................Editor................815-8625
datbbelliotts@prodigy.net,   www.renocoinclub.org

The RCC Board meets the third Tuesday of the month at Carrow’s at 7:30PM. Everyone is invited to attend.

If there is a topic you would like to see please let a board member know. Someone in the club knows all

The Other Coin: Olympic Coins
In renewing my subscription to the Numismatist, I was given a coin of the upcoming London Olympics. This reminded
me of one of the many topical ways to collect coins, both ancient and modern. Animals, astrological signs, labors of
Heracles, sailing vessels, etc. are all possible, but there is an extensive corpus of coins related to international sports.
                  











The original Olympics began in 776BC before coinage in Elis, Olympia as a means to have warring Greek tribes and city-
states compete without arms. By the 5th century BC, not only was Elis minting coins, but it became increasingly popular
for cities and royal competitors to mint coins honoring the winners. The



Elis, 252-208BC     
Eagle with hare/
Thunderbolt




King of Messana, Sicily Anaxilas, immortalized his victory in the chariot race of mules by producing coins celebrating his
victory.  Nike flies above the










biga of mules with a reverse of the hare, city symbol of Messana and dolphin below. Aspendos’s champion wrestler was
not noble and his name is lost, but his victory was heralded in a remarkable coin with wrestlers on the obverse and
slingers on the reverse. Slingers were the main military recruits available and were being advertised as well.












Probably, the most famous victor was Phillip II, father of Alexander the Great, who won both a chariot and horse race,
which marked Macedonia’s acceptance as true Greeks as well as his victory.     











Not surprisingly, many other cities got on the competitive sports band wagon advertizing the prizes available for the
contest on coins, usually called agonistic coins, meaning coin commemorating a trial or contest dedicate to Agon, the
god of games. Various Greek and Roman cities had contests of sports and arts for hundreds of years..










Julia Domna/Prize urns with palms flank Mt. Agreus     










SeptimusSeverus/prize table                                                                                            

Modern Olympic coinage began with the Finish games in 1952, followed by Japan in 1964 and then each succeeding
country minted coins for the Olympics including the US and USSR, sometimes with dozens of coins representing
different sports.



















Other countries, not hosting the games also often minted coins featuring the Olympics rings and various sporting events:











Collecting Olympic coins makes a nice ancient modern, international and US set. It is one of the many ways to collect
coins topically.

Numismatically yours, David Elliott

SS Central America
When the United States Mail Steamship Central America sank in deep water off the coast of the Carolinas during a
monstrous 1857 hurricane, it created a treasure from the California Gold Rush. Bound for New York with 578
passengers and crew, and 38,000 pieces of mail, the Central America also held tons of gold ingots, coins, nuggets, and
dust mined from the western gold fields during a defining quarter-century when the country came of age.




























2012 ANA Trivia Challenge
1. Which famous mathematician was credited with incuse and relief devices?
2. Paper money was first invented in China about 950AD. What nickname (in English) did the Chinese give these first
paper notes?
3. What is the name of the process where master dies are produced from master hubs?
4. Which famous Italian made sketches with his ideas for a coin-making press in 1500?
5. What was the location of the first mint established in mainland North America?        6. The application of edge
lettering on coins originated in the late middle ages, but was made easier by a machine invented in the late 17th century.
Which Frenchman is credited with the invention?
7. What state’s bank made the first deposit of silver to the united States Mint?
8. What X-shaped traditional currency shares its name with a short-lives African state that featured the currency on its
flag and the only two coins it ever minted?
9. What small island in the South Pacific is famous for its stone currency, which sometimes exceeded 12 feet in
diameter?
10. What is the term for a coin that is produced at twice its normal thickness?
11. The Us mint’s first steam coin press began minting coins in Philadelphia in 1836. What company produced the press?
12. In what year did “In God We Trust” become a feature of every coin produced by the ?united States?
13. What Gilded Age novel, published in 1887, predicted the widespread use of the “Credit Card?”
14. What is the largest denomination of paper money ever produced?
15. What coin is considered the world’s first bi-metallic coin?
16. What year saw the addition of polyester threads woven into US paper money to deter counterfeiting?
17. What African ethnic group’s “penny” adopted its odd shape to showcase the quality of its iron material?
18. What monetary innovation was introduced to the US in 1969?
19. What is the significance of Australia’s 1988 $10 commemorative bank note?
20. What mathematical discipline has played a crucial role in the development (and delay) of digital currency?
TIEBREAKER: Which former ANA president in 1920 called for a coin that celebrated peace following WWI, and was a
driving force behind the creation of the 1921 Peace Dollar?

Email or mail the answers to me David Elliott, datbbelliotts@prodigy.net, 2845 Edgewood Road, Reno, NV 89503 by
April 20th. We can win gold!